Sunday Sentence 12/11

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 HereonEarth

My weekly contribution to David Abrams’ “Sunday Sentence” project in which participants share the best sentence read during the past week “out of context and without commentary.”

The rain sounds like music from a distant planet.

SOURCE: Alice Hoffman‘s novel Here on Earth

 

 

Poets on Craft (Youtube) Playlist

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Just a few short (and not-so short) videos featuring Poets on Craft. Highlights include Jane Hirshfield speaking on transitions, Aimee Nez on capturing landscape/natural world, Tim Seibles on metaphor and Terrance Hayes reflecting on style. Enjoy!

 

Favorite Poetry Covers of 2016

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Buying Links:

Dos Madres Press
Litmus Press
Floating Bridge Press
Graywolf Press
Tarpaulin Sky
Paper Swans
Ashland Poetry Press
Milkweed Editions
Parlor Press
LSU Press
Press53
Yale Press
Tavern Books
Dancing Girl Press
Knives Forks Spoons Press
CavanKerry Press
Omnidawn Press
Tupelo Press
Mouthfeel Press
Bear Star Press
Marsh Hawk Press

More than a month #ReadNDN

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Native American Heritage Month has come and gone, but that doesn’t mean you should tuck those Bad NDN’s away.  Just like you’ve embraced the #readwomen movement, resolve to #readNDN all year.

Here’s three poetry collections to help get you started:

Heid Erdrich‘s CELL TRAFFIC (Sun Tracks, Univ. of AZ)

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Joy Harjo‘s CONFLICT RESOLUTION FOR HOLY BEINGS (W.W. Norton)

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Tiffany Midge‘s THE WOMAN WHO MARRIED A BEAR (Univ. of NM)

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Leave your suggestions in the comments.

Po-Fic Pairs

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Playing off Booktuber Jen Campbell’s Books to Read in Pairs Tag, I’ve got a few novel + poetry pairings for you. Whether you are a novels-only gal or a hardcore poethead, a double dip will enhance your literary muscle. Go ahead and brag to your friends over your next glass of wine or steaming cup of coffee!! #readwomen

[Sorry T.C., but you’re sort of the token male in this list.  I really liked your book, though, so there’s that.]

  1. Fiction: ORPHANS OF THE CARNIVAL   +     Poetry: CIRCASSIAN GIRL
  1. Fiction: THE OTHER EINSTEIN  +    Poetry: THE LOST LETTERS OF MILEVA
  1. Fiction:WHITE HEAT         +          Poetry: THE CORMORANT HUNTER’S WIFE
  1. Fiction:THE TERRANAUTS  +  Poetry: CERTAIN MAGICAL ACTS

Fall Surprise!!!!

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Yes, BoneSparkblog has been sadly neglected this summer, but I have something yummy for all you fiction writers out there…………….

A BRAND NEW YOUTUBE CHANNEL

featuring a Craft Talks (Writers on Writing) playlist that will blow your socks off.

But don’t let the genre labels fool you, scribblers, these videos have juicy advice that is applicable across categories.

So dig in!! And look for its poetry cousin in the very near future.

Symbols of Life, Rebirth & Renewal (#2sdayPoems)

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Today’s picks are from New England masters, and are poems short in length but long on symbolism–life (blue bowls), rebirth (cherries) and renewal (robin), to name a few.  I also wanted to gift you with a beautiful bit of flash fiction centered around the same symbolism.

BONUS ALERT===> Click Alice Walker’s “My Mother’s Blue Bowl” to read the piece in its entirety.  And be sure to check out more work from Daily Painter Kathy Wochele, whose painting “Cherries” is featured above.

 

THE BLUE BOWL

by Jane Kenyon

Like primitives we buried the cat
with his bowl. Bare-handed
we scraped sand and gravel
back into the hole. It fell with a hiss
and thud on his side,
on his long red fur, the white feathers
that grew between his toes, and his
long, not to say aquiline, nose.
We stood and brushed each other off.
There are sorrows much keener than these.jkenyoncollected
Silent the rest of the day, we worked,
ate, stared, and slept. It stormed
all night; now it clears, and a robin…

 

FULL TEXT HERE (w/ audio)

from Collected Poems (Graywolf, 2005)

 

CHERRIES

by Andrea Cohen

 

In the minute it took
to fetch the blue bowl

from the kitchen
to pick the just-ripe

cherries, the blackbirdsFurs-Not-Mine-front-cover
had come. They picked

the branches clean, ascending
into their own blue bowl.

Lacking wings, I…

 

FULL TEXT HERE
latest collection: Furs Not Mine (Fourway, 2015)

Sunday Sentence 6/19

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 eh

My weekly contribution to David Abrams’ “Sunday Sentence” project in which participants share the best sentence read during the past week “out of context and without commentary.”

There had been a sign to detour in the center of the main street of this town, but cars had obviously gone through, so, believing it was some repair which had been completed, Nicholas Adams drove on through the town along the empty, brick-paved street, stopped by traffic lights that flashed on and off on this traffic-less Sunday, and would be gone next year when the payments on the system were not met; on under the heavy trees of the small town that are a part of your heart if it is your town and you have walked under them, but that are only too heavy, that shut out the sun and that dampen the houses for a stranger; out past the last house and onto the highway that rose and fell straight away ahead with banks of red dirt sliced clearly away and the second-growth timber on both sides.

SOURCE: Ernest Hemingway’s short story “Fathers and Sons” from The Complete Short Stories of Ernest Hemingway: The Finca Vigia Edition

 

 

American Landscapes (#2sdayPoems)

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bigapplecow

Roadside “lawn ornament” (Mount Airy, NC)

I recently ran across this image of Mount Airy, NC’s Big Apple Cow in flickr wonderland.  Hope Bill doesn’t mind the link.  It made me think of a poem I’d seen on Poetry Out Loud in April, which led me back to another poem from  Poetry mag (June 2014), which ended in this interesting but somewhat rambling post. There are apples and cows and interior/American landscapes. Well, just read the post.

[ Use the links for full text, author bio and collection info.]

 

IN A LANDSCAPE: I
by John Gallaher

“Are you happy?” That’s a good place to start, or maybe,
“Do you think you’re happy?” with its more negative
tone. Sometimes you’re walking, sometimes falling. That’s part
of the problem too, but not all of the problem. Flowers out the window
or on the windowsill, and so someone brought flowers.
We spend a long time interested in which way the car would
best go in the driveway. Is that the beginning of an answer?
Some way to say who we are?

 

Well, it brings us up to now, at any rate, as the limitations
of structure, which is the way we need for it to be. Invent some muses
and invoke them, or save them for the yard, some animus
to get us going. And what was it Michael said yesterday? That
the committee to do all these good things has an agenda to do all these
other things as well, that we decide are less good in our estimation,
so then we have this difficulty. It just gets to you sometimes. We have
a table of red apples and a table of green apples, and someone asks youinalandscape_bookstore_large
about apples, but that’s too general, you think, as you’ve made several distinctions to get to this place of two tables, two colors. How can that be an answer to anything?…

 

FULL TEXT HERE

from In a Landscape(BOA,2014)

 

TO LIVE WITH A LANDSCAPE

By Constance Urdang

 

      1
Take your boulevards, your Locust Street,
Your Chestnut, Pine, your Olive,
Take your Forest Park and Shaw’s Garden,
Your avenues that lead past street-corner violence,
Past your West End, past your Limit,
To shabby suburban crime,
Vandalism in the parking-lot,
Abductions from the shopping mall—
Like making the same mistake over and over
On the piano or typewriter keys,
Always hitting the wrong note—
How “very alive, very American”
They are, how chockful of metaphysics,
Hellbent to obliterate the wilderness.

 

    2
Learn to live with sycamores,
Their sad, peeling trunks, scabbed all over
With shabby patches, their enormous leaves
In dingy shades of ochre and dun1297937
Rattling like castanets, their roots
Thick as a man’s leg, crawling
Like enormous worms out of the broken pavements,
Continually thrusting themselves up
From pools of shade they make,
Sculpturing the street
With dappled dark and light
As glaucoma, a disease of the eye,
Makes the world more beautiful
With its mysterious rainbows…

 

 

FULL TEXT HERE
from The Lone Woman and Others (Univ. of Pittsburgh, 1980)