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BachChoraleIIIn the wake of all this Miley nonsense, I’m contemplating fame and its aftermath.  Here is what Emily Dickinson has to say on the subject:

Fame is a bee.
It has a song --
It has a sting --
Ah, too, it has a wing

Sounds a bit like a two-headed hydra. One that has turned around and nipped Miley in her little twerking a$@!

The thing that makes the whole mess borderline tragic is that the girl really has talent. And I thought that she was moving in the right direction with the release of her cover of Dolly Parton’s “Jolene” http://bit.ly/187U6iu.

I thought maybe she would reinvent herself a la Jewel. Though, some would argue about that particular transition.  I kind of like Countrified Jewel myself, so don’t hate.

My advice to Miley is this: never forget what you can do. Tattoo it on your arm and SING!

And on that note, I leave you with this poem by Naomi Shihab Nye:

FAMOUS

The river is famous to the fish.

The loud voice is famous to silence,
which knew it would inherit the earth
before anybody said so.

The cat sleeping on the fence is famous to the birds
watching him from the birdhouse.

The tear is famous, briefly, to the cheek.

The idea you carry close to your bosom
is famous to your bosom.

The boot is famous to the earth,
more famous than the dress shoe,
which is famous only to floors.

The bent photograph is famous to the one who carries it
and not at all famous to the one who is pictured.

I want to be famous to shuffling men
who smile while crossing streets,
sticky children in grocery lines,
famous as the one who smiled back.

I want to be famous in the way a pulley is famous,
or a buttonhole, not because it did anything spectacular,
but because it never forgot what it could do.

Okay, maybe one more thing before I sign off. This one is by me:

FAME IS A FOUR LETTER WORD

and it corrupts absolutely, but
unlike its cousin power, it chews
from the inside out and leaves
nothing of you after

**Opening art provided by physicist Eric J. Heller. The featured piece is a sonogram of a Bach chorale played on a piano.  More of Heller’s art can be found in this gallery.

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